Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘advice’

More than a hundred years ago, a Delsartean-inspired actor who figured out how to regain voice loss named F.M. Alexander noticed a principle of human nature related to movement perception and gave it a term: “debauched kinesthesia.”

A more modern term might be: “Sensory Dissonance.” It is what happens when there is a violation of the brain’s “predictive coding” processes that have been described by neuroscience in the Bayesian model of the brain. This model explains how we can instinctively work out whether there is time to cross the road in front of an approaching car or not. We make a prediction based on past experiences, with these predictions (hopefully) updated “on the fly.” Of course, if our “predictive coding” ability doesn’t match reality, our next reaction will depend on how we deal with being wrong. The confounding, irrational quality that a Sensory Dissonant experience seems to possess is related to points described by the terms: Cognitive Dissonance and Cognitive Bias. Denial is most common; (described in *THIS* collection as the “Confirmation Bias”) and accidents can result. If you haven’t read it yet, I have previously outlined in the first half (in the previous post below) the relationship of Sensory Dissonance to these latter categories.

Why Sensory Dissonance Is Important

Aside from avoiding accidents, many more advantages will come from further consideration of this topic. A most interesting area is performance – when you know how to do something, but can’t reliably do it when needed. Or when doing what you imagine you know how to do doesn’t get you where you want to end up.

What most people do about having experienced Sensory Dissonance after making a “mistake,” is to rearrange themselves back to where they believe they “should” be physically oriented. Returning to whatever you sense was the “normal” state of affairs will feel “right” merely because it is most familiar. Because noting your reactions about Sensory Dissonance may also contain an expression of “Cognitive Dissonance” it probably will also be somewhat uncomfortable. (Maybe not; some have learned to welcome and find excitement in what is unfamiliar and unknown.) There’s a payoff of predictable security to resume what is familiar for most people. Most people will be motivated when noting a mismatch to put themselves “right again.”

But should you? But what if your sense of “right” needs calibrating? What if you feel strange when there hasn’t been a kid on your shoulders or you have not done an experiment pushing your arms against a door frame? (Check out the examples in the *first half* of this article.)

When Sensory Dissonance pops into your awareness, there’s an advantage to purposefully allow yourself to feel “strange” and to take a moment to consider what you’re going to do about it. The experience of Sensory Dissonance is an important pointer. This “strange” feedback reveals previously unknown information about the nature of the real state of affairs that would benefit from your thoughtful consideration of what to do about it. It’s an opportunity, don’t ignore it!

Perceptual dissonance is a signal that something different from the norm has just happened. You have the option to act on having noticed a difference by taking the reins back from habitual routines. This calls for using some awareness, strategic thinking and perhaps serious study to revise the affected routines. Perceptual dissonance gives you valuable feedback about what you have been overdoing that might be unnecessary. Viva la difference!

It would be really crazy if every time you carried a weight for awhile, you wanted to put the weight back on again to avoid feeling Sensory Dissonance. But this is the understandable urge in certain situations.

An example: while swimming. Getting back into the water where it feels relatively “warmer” seems logical when the wind factor on skin makes you feel cold in comparison…until your submerged body temperature really drops to match the temperature of the water. Chattering from the cold, you pretty quickly realize that getting back in the water to “get warm” is a short-sighted solution. However, there are many other situations that don’t offer this obvious feedback of mistakenly having made that short-sighted choice!

Act Wisely on Sensory Dissonance

Next time you feel disoriented, consider what this means. Here is a potential for an insight. Maybe pause and consider what you’d like to do about having received a curious sensation of perceptual dissonance, instead of ignoring it and getting yourself back to where you “feel right.”

By deliberately experimenting with Sensory Dissonance, you’ll realize that human sensory orientation judgment is relative, not absolutely “True.”

For instance, if you often stand with your weight on the ball of your foot or on one foot and something gets you to stand with your weight on your heels or both feet, Sensory Dissonance will make you feel strange as if you are leaning backwards or to the “wrong” side. (Women who routinely wear high heels and walk mostly on the ball of their feet know this sensation.) Getting back into those high heels to feel “normal” or transferring all your weight to the other foot is like getting back into the pool to get warm – a short-sighted solution. But in this situation, there is no feedback like getting cold if you stay in the water to tell you that you chose wrong, (unless your feet or calves eventually start hurting or your knees start crumbling.)

What Sensory Dissonance Is Really Telling You

What you might want to do is to think a bit about the important information that Sensory Dissonance is offering you. It’s really saying that your habitual “normal” has been violated. Did you know you were actively doing something in the opposite direction of what Sensory Dissonance just revealed to you? You didn’t until now. Because of the Sensory Dissonance signal, you now have the option of taking the reins back from your habit by using some awareness and strategic thinking to consider changing some of those habits.

The actor quoted at the beginning of the article has solutions. His “Alexander Technique” method always contain this Sensory Dissonant signal that something different has happened. An Alexander Technique teacher gives experiences in classes and “hands-on guided modeling” that reliably feel as if something mysterious and lighter has happened to your movement coordination. It’s the only answer I know about for sifting out problematic features from previously ingrained habits “on the fly,” addressing performance issues involving postural mannerisms.

Hope this little article will lead you to question what you should do about it when you feel Sensory Dissonance. Surprising dissonant sensations can be used as important pointers to bring to your attention that what you just did, felt or experienced. What just happened was something entirely, originally new and different – for you. Here is something that could benefit from your serious attention and consideration – and maybe even be worth investing in long-term study of Alexander Technique!

Read Full Post »

As a young person, I felt my ability to change myself around to adapt to others and the situation was objectionable. It was as if I was presenting myself dishonestly because I had no predictable, consistent persona to present consistently to everyone. Thankfully, I ran into a mentor who was much older with this same talent. He considered my “problem” to be a talent that was the mark of good teaching. Because of his opinion, I resisted settling on adopting a consistent way of presenting myself to the world. After observing how other people reacted to him, I found out that people weren’t really paying attention to inconsistencies of character anyway. They were mostly self-centered on their own concerns. (At least my young adult age group at the time was like that.)

Evidently what I went though wasn’t uncommon. Young people tend to feel a need to decide on what and how they’re going to present themselves to the world. Ritualized postural gestures are definitely one means young people “settle on” to carry this out.

As adults, teachers and mentors, we should target teens and young adults to help them influence each other about what is considered “cool.” This would detour the origin of how people get themselves stuck into postural contortions they can’t undo later. Of course, this means that we will need to know how to surpass the way that we get stuck into contortions we can’t get away from doing! For that life skill, Alexander Technique is the way to go.

I also owe a debt of gratitude to a compassionate boyfriend who used to reach over without a word and smooth away the gesture on my brow. I had developed this knitted-brow gesture to show concern when I spoke to others and did it far too often. If he hadn’t done such a sweet thing so often for me, I would have never known I was doing it to myself long enough to change it. At sixty as I look at my face now without the common care-lines of those my age, I sing his praises for the wonderful expression of caring he extended to me at exactly the time it counted.

I offer these stories from my own life as a way anyone can provide valuable feedback for those who are close to them, inspired by the principles of Alexander Technique. Of course you would do so with their consent and encouragement. I would encourage you to use an expression of compassionate action in a gesture as the best way to carry this out, because merely saying something can too easily become an admonishment of criticism. An affectionate gesture can also be done in polite company and is (usually) socially considered to be appropriate among family members and best friends. We don’t know exactly when we’re doing these things to ourselves – and that’s the sort of invaluable feedback that you can provide to your loved ones.

Read Full Post »

A “habit of my life” is to not look at what I do not wish to acknowledge. How can I go against the habit and change it if I don’t even notice it?

With the intro from yesterday, now you’re ready to pick and choose from these additional tips, depending on what might apply to your particular situation. This the concluding part of a two-part series.

Next tip:
Evoke your objections to changing on purpose so you can investigate its features and challenge your own assumptions. You would do this by deliberately engaging in an action that is sure to disturb you, and notice the resistances and reactions that come that you would usually want to ignore. Write down your objections and justifications for doing things the old same way. Once you have this list, use thinking skills to question assumptions and find new ways to fulfill the challenge. Don’t worry about it if the items on the list don’t make sense. Lots of feelings don’t make any sense, but they will still have just as much power over your choices.

Here’s another tip: Note the situation where it has happened or might happen again. Then install a reminder for yourself to notice what is happening and remember your reminder to be able to watch yourself do it as it starts to happen. You’ll find that at first you won’t be able to ‘catch yourself’ doing it until it’s done, but gradually, you’ll be able to notice it sooner and sooner in the process. Trace it back to right before it really begins. There will be your emotional reasoning and motive that installed the nuisance habit can be fulfilled in another way.

Questioning and trace the feelings back to its suspected origin is tricky. It will probably take repeated attempts that get closer and closer to the origin of when your habitual solutions that you’d like to change will “go off.” Question your own assumptions about these emotional origins until you actually are able to pay attention to what you feel right before you’re about to do the habitual solution. Don’t think you know it all.

Sometimes we come up with an explanation that’s not what’s happening or is a placeholder or only part of the real origin. Mistaken assumptions about origins and interpretations of them have the power to open up significant new insights. Stay with the unpleasantness the habit was designed to avoid, because there is a big, important reason the habit was installed. When you do find yourself there, it will be very uncomfortable. But we’re designed to cry to relieve stress.

Alternately, you could learn Alexander Technique so you know how to physically move out of feeling bad when you find yourself there. Knowing A.T. will wake up your senses so you can see new ways of providing for your needs when you arrive at that point. The advantage is the solution will work from that point forward, unlike solutions that require practice.

Or, try this solution: If you know what you prefer, do a few other variations that are what you don’t prefer and note your reactions somewhere where you’ll be able to read them later. Once you know what it is you’re willing to work on, wait until you see a chance to change it and jump in feet first to do it.

For example: It’s tricky to tell the difference between a prejudice and a “gut instinct” intuition. I didn’t want to know that I had a prejudice, but I did. I found I had it by questioning some part of me that instantly “wrote off” a person as untrustworthy, which seemed blatantly unreasonable at the time. By this chance I became aware of a prejudice I had toward people who had “wandering eyes.”

I got past this issue for myself by intentionally getting to know a person like this the next time I was introduced, instead of following my innate urge to ignore and avoid them. Getting to know them violated my ‘gut instincts’ but it really helped me to figure out what it was I was responding to in them. I found out that people who had “wandering eyes” weren’t untrustworthy liars.

Of course, for all of these you will forget and catch yourself after the crucial moment passes when you could have caught the habitual reaction. But, that is when to apply those wonderful character traits of patience and forgiveness. This time, you know these admirable character traits are not pulling the wool over your own eyes.

Read Full Post »

Recently, the Alexander Technique community has been treated to an online course in business management. Offered by Jeremy Chance, he’s now in the stage where he’s using real people as examples. Being a classic under-achiever, I volunteered!
http://jeremychance.blogspot.jp/2013/01/w0106-case-studies-franis-engel-in.html
This led to a chat with Jeremy revealing the challenges inherent in my twisted sense of business acumen that I’d like to share with you. We were discussing the selection of a “niche” in marketing.

The psychic core that has you dashing from one thing to another and not sticking with a conscious, constructive plan that could give you the support your brilliance needs. I have a few people like this, and I number myself among them. I was “saved” by getting married at 43 and having two kids – I HAD TO STICK TO SOMETHING. Three other people depended upon me. It seems to me that is the core issue you face – do you agree? Do you have another take? I think that would serve many readers…

Yes, I have another “take.” “Following the tried and true” is a common admonition that hasn’t worked for me.
The drive is obviously in me, because why would I continue to be so dedicated to writing? Writing about subjective experience is tricky; it wasn’t my natural talent. Can I turn my writing skill into a money-making form? Either I need to invent a new form, (such as a Skype workshop series?) or marry some of my skills into a new form that combines what I already have done with A.T. as experimental principles. I’ll have to think about that one. What do I already do as naturally as breathing? (Off the cuff, I’m best at generating ideas designing experiments via telephone workshops.)
My best role model in the A.T. World would be Roy Palmer. His “niche” is “writing e-books about AT in sports.” Roy has defined a large, free ranging area of his interest and continues to publish e-books for each area. Each book is supported by a unique website and other marketing activities that are all similar for every book he publishes.
I have plenty of possible money-making projects that show potential that would support the appearance of students who want to learn A.T. But I just don’t finish them. From Barbara Sher’s advice, I’ve realized perhaps my problem has been a lack of a “buddy” to support and keep me on track.
Anyway – our society is made of specialists who are “known for” what they do. I don’t fit that model because I’m a generalist. I’m an innovator-journalist. Specialization is a fad.

Yeah, because it [niche specialization] works!

True. But I’ve tried to fit into that “specialist” mold in my life. It doesn’t supply fulfilment. Attempting to cram yourself into a mold will result in the you or the mold breaking. I’ve already experienced the break.

I’ve trained for more than one job that involved a lifestyle template that I wasn’t able to tolerate. Yet, the training model and activities themselves were exactly perfect.
Even the energy required to complete teacher-training for A.T. wasn’t sustainable for me – I financially crashed and burned right in the middle of my A.T. Training. Someone my age at that time would have had parents come to their rescue; I didn’t. If it wasn’t for Marj Barstow offering me the trade of writing for her in exchange for her teaching me, I wouldn’t have been able to finish my teacher training.

You can’t do what you don’t know if you keep on doing what you do know!

Except I’ve been there, done that. It was unsustainable for me. In a sense, specialization for me is short-term “end-gaining.” I guess that’s not the case completely. I specialize in my mural sign painting on windows without suffering, because it’s seasonal.

We all have the capacity to over-ride our essential nature in the service of …what? For you it was the needs of your family that convinced you to change. As I said, me having more money is just not enough to convince me to change that nature in myself.  Maybe wanting to communicate the benefit of my experience is – so I’ve been doing that directly. The complication is that people won’t recognize the value of my experience – unless I make them pay for it.


Jeremy, you suggested a mentor – who has knowledge of a similar sort of person who I’m trying to reach. Let’s say my “perfect students” are those multi-talented older women. Barbara Sher sells to this same crowd. I’ll use her “Wish-Obstacle” format.
Wish: To inspire the desire for a need for what I offer that nobody knows they need. Obstacle: people have no frame of reference for what it is I’m able to offer them – how do they get this?
I’ve asked her directly. Barbara Sher said, “Tell a story to show the context.”
  Would story-telling work in place of hands-on, which offers context?

I have a strange idea. Perhaps the answer for me is merely to teach Alexander Technique at cost. I haven’t tried that yet. I’d be willing to see where it leads me. If I’m resisting making money in some way – what is the harm in “give in” to that urge to share what I have to offer at cost? There is no A.T. Teacher who will suffer from me giving inexpensive classes, because I am the only teacher who is teaching on the Big Island right now. Wish: to communicate by using my talent for rapport. Obstacle: lack of respect. People don’t pay attention when a teacher makes learning easy, because the student is not making enough of a [monetary] sacrifice. Your answer?

My continuing interest in writing about A.T. merely comes from believing in A.T. effectiveness and wanting to communicate it. I guess I must ask myself, “Is writing about A.T. without getting paid and having a couple of students a month satisfying enough for it to be all I ever do?”

Read Full Post »